Celebrating
a centenary
of Learning

  • 49
  • by Adele Gardner
  • graduated 2007; 2015
  • studied MEd in Psychology of Education, Doctor of Philosophy in Education (PhD)
  • from UK

The Graduate School of Education introduced me to some inspirational thinkers, such as Guy Claxton, and this made me realise that I wanted to develop a career within Higher Education.

I am a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education. Initially, I followed the MEd Psychology of Education Pathway. I opted for this because of the range of interesting modules. I also loved the fact that there were students from all over the world, most of whom were teachers in their countries of origin. This gave a rich and rewarding global dimension to study at Master’s Level.

I contacted a number of universities to enquire about their postgraduate programmes and the Graduate School of Education made the effort to make me feel valued as a prospective student. I had also been living away from the South West for a year prior to enrolling on the MEd, so taking up a programme of study at the Graduate School of Education felt very much like coming home. I was born in Bristol and the city is an integral part of my earliest memories. It is the place where lifelong friendships were formed and where my daughter was born. During my childhood, the University of Bristol ran an annual fundraising event called the RAG. It was wonderful because it engaged the wider city in the life, spirit and vibrancy of the University.

The Graduate School of Education introduced me to some inspirational thinkers, such as Guy Claxton, and this made me realise that I wanted to develop a career within Higher Education. Once I had successfully completed the MEd I began to think seriously about continuing my studies to PhD level. I enrolled as a part-time PhD student so that I could continue to build a career in Education while continuing to be research active in an area that I was passionately interested in.

The first seminar given by Sara Meadows that I attended was life-changing. Sara takes developmental psychology to a whole new level. But a successful educational experience rarely rests with just one person; it is a team effort, which includes input from academic staff, administrative staff, and our wonderful librarians. The fellowship of my fellow students, and the support and encouragement of my PhD supervisors Sara and David, continue to be highly influential. Ruth Deakin-Crick, Anthony Feiler and John Franey have all helped enormously too.